Picture
Picture
Picture

(Universal, Not Rated, DVD-$29.98 SRP)

I can't even begin to describe the profound sense of shame that accompanied my viewing of every single one of the three discs contained in the Blind Date: Uncensored box-set. Yes, there's a train wreck quality to the show, which chronicles the often disastrous hook-ups orchestrated by what can only be described as utterly sadistic producers… and I couldn't turn away.

Picture
Picture

(Warner Bros, Rated PG, DVD-$27.98 SRP)

Any move with Jerry O'Connell is – by government order – required to be deemed brainless humor. Team him up with Jerry Bruckheimer and you've gone positively flatline. Ah, but what to do with Kangaroo Jack – a film that is mindless as can be, but manages to exude the sort of charm that only comes from a brilliant mixture of pity and derision being elicited in the viewer. Yes, I watched Kangaroo Jack on DVD – and I survived. And you should watch it, too, if only for the Kangaroo -  who really should have been given the lead. The DVD contains an audio commentary with  Kangaroo Jack, a second commentary (with actors Jerry O'Connell, Anthony Anderson, and Estella Warren, director David McNally, writers Steve Bing and Scott Rosenberg, and visual effects supervisor Hoyt Yeatman), "Casting Sessions Uncut" featurette, "Behind The Gas" sound mixing featurette, "Marsupial Magic" Jack featurette, gag reel, "Sing Along With Jackie Leggs", and "Jackie Leg's Dance Grooves".

Picture
Picture

(Eagle Rock, Not Rated, DVD-$29.98 SRP)

The Man Show is an unashamedly, unabashedly hedonistic, sexist, politically incorrect program. That's its charm and raison d'etre. Hosted/created by eternal frat boys Jimmy Kimmel and Adam Carolla, it celebrates everything it means to be a man, from the crass to the crude and back again. The Man Show Season One: Volume One collects the first 10 episodes, and also includes additional segments that didn't make it to air.

Picture
Picture

(Universal, Not Rated, DVD-$19.98 SRP)

After years of toiling in supporting roles, Tony Shalhoub has finally been gifted with a vehicle befitting his skills. In Monk, Shalhoub is Adrian Monk -  a brilliant homicide detective who was suspended from the force due to his extreme obsessive-compulsiveness. After a string of unsolved murders begin to mount, his old Captain calls him back to active duty – phobias and all. Offbeat and engrossing, this is quality TV – a rare commodity. Unfortunately, we're not getting the complete first season on DVD – only the premiere episode. I guess beggars can't be choosers. Still, it is in anamorphic widescreen… and if we're lucky, a full season will make its way to store shelves in the near future.

Picture
Picture

(National Geographic, Not Rated, DVD-$24.95 SRP)

Yet another example of how current events become history with lightening speed, this documentary follows the build-up and execution of the second Gulf War (you know, from a few months back) with never-before-seen footage and first-hand accounts. I'm a documentary junkie, so you know I loved it.

Picture
Picture

(Universal, Rated PG, DVD-$19.98 SRP)

Although quickly dismissed at the box office when it came out in '92, I have a hard time hating any film that stars John Goodman – especially in a role tailor-made for him, that of the legendary Babe Ruth. Unflinching in its portrayal of the complicated sports hero, Goodman turns in an epic performance fitting the legend – and now it's on DVD, ready to be rediscovered. The anamorphic disc also contains two featurettes on Ruth, as well as the original theatrical trailer.

Picture
Picture

(Universal, Rated PG, DVD-$14.98 SRP)

No matter who makes the attempt, it's incredibly easy to see the pedigree in a film adaptation of a Neil Simon play. The dialogue, rhythms, and characters are like a brand – there's simply no escaping the style. One of my favorite examples is Brighton Beach Memoirs, about the coming-of-age (yes, that old chestnut) of 15 year-old Eugene Jerome (a very young Jonathan Silverman). The humor is made all the more sharp when delivered by the vivid characters that exist in the Simon-verse. Now that it's on DVD, it's worth rediscovering this flick (and even making a double feature alongside Lost in Yonkers). Sadly, the disc only contains the original theatrical trailer.

Picture
Picture

(Warner Bros, Rated G, DVD-$29.95 SRP each)

Although Charlie Chaplin's films have been available on DVD for quite some time (practically since the introduction of the format), the releases have often been of inferior quality with – shall we say – far from optimum picture and sound, and scant supplements. With the first four volumes of Warner Home Video's Chaplin Collection, memories of those lackluster editions will be forever eradicated. Each film (The Gold Rush, Modern Times, The Great Dictator, and Limelight) have been fully restored. It's not hyperbole when I say the picture and sound is truly stunning – akin to the same shock I had upon first viewing Warners restored Citizen Kane. Gone is the dirt, grain, scratches, and degradation that marred past transfers. I'm floored. Not content to merely present a vivid restoration, these releases are also loaded with bonus features. All four films contain contextual introductions from Chaplin's biographer David Robinson, documentaries, behind the scenes footage (including color production footage from Great Dictator), deleted scenes, unfinished shorts, photo galleries, trailer, home movies – and the list goes on! I can only hope Warner continues to release the rest of Chaplin's output with the same love and care.

Picture
Picture

(Touchstone, Rated PG, DVD-$14.99 SRP)

In 1994, Woody Allen filmed an adaptation of his early 1960's play Don't Drink the Water for TV. A Cold War farce about a tourist family (Allen, Julie Kavner, & Mayim Bialik) who seek shelter in the American Embassy after being accused of spying while on a trip behind the Iron Curtain, this film sparkles with the Allen energy of old. Within the embassy walls, chaos ensues – the ambassador is in Washington, leaving matters in the hands of his bumbling son (Michael J. Fox), a stir crazy priest who sought asylum 6 years prior (Dom Deluise) shows off his magic hobby to a now captive audience, and all the while, tensions mount outside as relations begin to spiral out of control.

Picture
Picture

(Universal, Rated PG, DVD-$14.98 SRP)

In retrospect, the 80's are just chock full of forgotten cinema gems. Okay, okay… maybe "gems" is going a bit far, but there seem to be a high percentage of enjoyable flicks that get very little notice today, and The Dream Team is one of them. I mean, come on – a film about four mental patients on the loose in New York after their doctor is attacked by two corrupt cops? I'm rolling on the floor right now! Okay, okay… maybe that's because the four patients are played by Michael Keaton, Christopher Lloyd, Peter Boyle, and Stephen Furst. No, it's not the funniest film ever made, but I get a kick out of it every time I see it. The anamorphic DVD contains the original theatrical trailer and… well… that's it.

Picture
Picture

(Miramax, Rated R, DVD-$29.99 SRP)

It took forever and a day for director Martin Scorsese to finish, so was the wait worth it for Gangs of New York? Honestly, no. As a period piece, it's a fairly entertaining ride. The story – about the personal vendetta of a young Irish immigrant (Leonardo DiCaprio) seeking the man who killed his father (Daniel Day-Lewis, playing the historical Bill the Butcher) – is interesting enough to keep my attention, but only because it is set within the larger milieu of the immigrant riots in nineteenth century New York. Otherwise, the film has a tendency to bog down, and the performances (especially Day-Lewis's) are a bit too broad for my tastes. The 2-disc anamorphic DVD set contains an audio commentary with Scorsese, featurettes ("Exploring The Sets", "Set Design", "Costume Design", "History Of The Five Points" and "Five Points Study Guide"), "Uncovering The Real Gangs Of New York" Discovery Channel special, and "The Hands That Built America" U2 music video.

Picture
Picture

(Fox, Not Rated, $39.98 SRP)

When I first saw promos for King of the Hill years ago, I didn't know what to make of it. It was obvious that it was from the man behind Beavis & Butthead, Mike Judge, but I wasn't sure if that was a good thing. I mean, B&B were fine in short doses, but a TV show with that sensibility? It took me awhile to finally experience King of the Hill (sometime during the second season), but when I finally did, I dug what I saw. Here was a show that combined the best aspects of sitcoms and animation, punctuated with vivid characters and sharp writing. And the show's just gotten better. Experiencing its origins via the 13 episodes contained on the King of the Hill: The Complete First Season box set only goes to show me that I needn't have waited so long to watch it – it was great from the start. The 3-disc DVD set contains a 30-minute behind-the-scenes documentary (including interviews with the voice cast, which is a definite plus), audio commentaries on select episodes with producer Greg Daniels and director Klay Hall, deleted scenes, TV spots, Barenaked Ladies music video, "Meet the Hills" feature, and the "Do's and Don'ts of King of the Hill". The best feature of all, though (and one I wish the Simpsons and Futurama sets would try even once) is character commentaries on select episodes – 2 with Peggy and Bobby Hill, and 2 with Bill and Dale. Improvised completely in character, they are simply hilarious.

Picture
Picture

(Warner Bros, Not Rated, DVD-$ SRP)

Based on the film of the same name, the TV series of La Femme Nikita was the ultimate popcorn show. As Nikita – a woman framed for murder but given the alternative of becoming a secret operative for the mysterious Section One – Peta Wilson was all icy stares and kick-butt action in outfits that were usually heavy on the leather. La Femme Nikita: The Complete First Season collects the first 22 episodes across a six disc box-set. The set also includes audio commentaries from series co-creator Joel Surnow (on the premiere and the season finale), deleted scenes, a behind-the-scenes featurette, and a photo gallery.

Picture
Picture

(New Line, Rated R, DVD-$26.97 SRP)

As guilty pleasures go, The Real Cancun either wasn't guilty enough, or far too guilty for even the most die-hard reality show fanatics. Personally, I thought it was neither offensive nor groundbreaking, but exactly what I've come to love and expect from the people who bring me my guilt-intensive Real World/Road Rules fix every year. Following around a group of intelligence-impaired teenagers on their spring break in sunny Cancun, Mexico, the film is like combining a soap opera with Girls Gone Wild. The anamorphic DVD contains deleted scenes, "cast insights", highlights from the film's premiere, TV spots, and the theatrical trailer.

Picture
Picture

(Fox, Rated R, DVD-$26.98 SRP)

As more and more films are re-released on DVD as Penultimate/Ultimate/Titanic/SooperDooper/Hyperbolic editions, it can be a bit confusing as to what's really worth the time or effort to pick up. One whose additional bonus features pushed me over the edge into "it's worth it" territory is the "There's Something More About Mary" edition of… well… There's Something About Mary. So what do you get on this 2-disc set? An extended cut of the film, existing audio commentary with the Farrelly Bros. (from the original DVD), a new scene-specific commentary with the Farrelly Bros., an audio commentary with writers Ed Decter & John J. Strauss, 13 deleted scenes/extended scenes with optional Farrelly commentary, the original claymation opening credits, "Getting Behind Mary" behind-the-scenes diary footage, the Comedy Central "Reel Comedy" special, featurettes, interview, marketing materials, outtakes, and much more.

Picture
Picture

(ADV, Not Rated, DVD-$29.98 SRP)

I've been waiting years for the 1989 TV adaptation of Around the World in 80 Days to hit DVD. Starring a pre-Bond Pierce Brosnan as Phileas Fogg, Eric Idle as Passepartout, and Peter Ustinov as detective Wilbur Fixx – not to mention guest stars Christopher Lee, Robert Wagner, Lee Remick, and Roddy McDowell -  it's an enjoyable mini series.

Picture
Picture

(Anchor Bay, Not Rated, DVD-$19.98 SRP)

In every way that Brett Ratner's Red Dragon failed as a thrilling piece of filmmaking, Michael Mann's Manhunter succeeds. Both are based on the same story, but Mann's take is markedly more mature and nuanced. It also benefits from its Hannibal Lecter – Brian Cox. By the time of Red Dragon, Anthony Hopkins' take on the character had become a cloying cliché – Cox's Lecter is chilling in his psychological brutality. What better way to watch the superior Manhunter than on a newly remastered special edition DVD? Manhunter: Restored Director's Cut contains bonus footage, remastered picture and sound, an audio commentary with Mann, deleted & alternate scenes, a still gallery, and the original theatrical trailer.

Picture
Picture

(Columbia/Tristar, Not Rated, DVD-$24.95 SRP)

Even if the quality tends to be a bit spotty, I will always be fond of this film for one simple reason – it has an incredible performance… er… performances from Peter Sellers. Sellers plays both the Prime Minister and Duchess of the tiny Duchy of Fenwick, whose economy is on the skids. Their solution? Declare war on the US, surrender, then collect the lucrative post-war aid. Their plan runs into a bit of a complication when they fail to inform their invasion force leader (Sellers again), who stumbles upon a secret weapon that could actually win them the war. Sellers tour de force is right up there with Alec Guiness' multi-role spin in Kind Hearts and Coronets.

Picture
Picture

(Fox, Rated R, DVD-$27.98 SRP)

As thrillers go, Joel Schumacher's long-delayed Phone Booth is a pistol. Taut and gripping, it certainly held my attention for its duration (which is quite a feat, really). This almost (ALMOST) makes up for all the pain I suffered with Batman & Robin . The anamorphic DVD contains an audio commentary with Schumacher and trailers.

Picture
Picture

(Warner Bros, Not Rated, DVD-$44.98 SRP)

As a show, the only problem Friends ever had was that it got too popular for those critics that hate anything popular. It's meteoric rise to pop culture buzz guaranteed that it would eventually suffer a backlash, regardless of the show's quality. Hopefully, though, audience will discover – via DVD – that Friends has always been a consistently well-written, brilliantly performed show. Personally, I feel that the show was really firing on all cylinders during its fourth season – which, ironically enough, is available on DVD in Friends: The Complete Fourth Season. Imagine that? In the 23 episodes spanning this four disc set, we've got Phoebe and Monica's job hunting, Chandler's betrayal of Joey (and Thanksgiving box punishment), the apartment switch, Phoebe's pregnancy, Ross's engagement to Emily, Rachel's realization that she still loves Ross, and the big London wedding finale. Special features include three audio commentaries with Kevin Bright, Marta Kauffman, and David Crane (on the episodes "The One With Chandler in a Box", "The One With the Embryos", and "The One With Ross's Wedding"), "Friends Around the World" featurette, "Friends of Friends" video guestbook, character bios, and a trivia quiz. Sadly, the documentary on the filming of the London episodes, which was available on the Best of Friends DVD release, is missing - why, I have no idea. If you've yet to sample the show, you've now got four wonderful seasons on DVD with which to do so. You won't be sorry. And for us fans – keep 'em coming, Warners!

Picture
Picture

(Warner Bros, Rated PG-13, DVD-$27.98 SRP)

I admit – there were times during Gods and Generals where I just wanted to tell the actors on screen that the audience knows who won the Civil War, thank you, so can we please leave now… but I had to admire producer Ted Turner's earnest, exhaustive approach to presenting the dynamics behind the early struggles of the Civil War – including Manassas, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville. Yes, it does play a bit like a long (and I mean really long) form documentary, but there is a place for that in the world. Give this flick a try with that in mind. Bonus features include an audio commentary with writer/director Ronald F. Maxwell and two of the film's historical advisors, an introduction by Turner, 3 in-depth documentaries, music videos by Bob Dylan and Mary Fahl, and the theatrical trailer.

Picture
Picture

(Fox, Not Rated, DVD-$39.98 SRP)

Col. Blake and Trapper John were gone, and Col. Sherman T. Potter and B.J. Hunnicutt were in. Thus began the fourth season of M*A*S*H, a transitional season that would only be topped by the radical shift in tone that accompanied the departure of Major Frank Burns after Season 5 (taking with him most of the show's humor). Personally, I really enjoy the fourth season – it's not as screwball as the early seasons, but not as preachy as the show would become in later years. A perfect balance, if you ask me. This season also contains the classic episode "The Interview", one of the most genuinely heartfelt pieces the show ever did. Special features are nil, unless you count the welcome ability to shut off the laugh track.

Picture
Picture

(Touchstone, Rated PG-13, DVD-$29.99 SRP)

I was a big fan of Shanghai Noon. In fact, as a Jackie Chan outing, I think it left the Rush Hour series in the dust. The humor was sharper, the direction was tighter, and the dynamic between Chan and Owen Wilson was a stronger contrast. That's probably why I was nervous about Shanghai Knights . The sequel game is often a losing affair, leading to pain and disappointment. I needn't have worried. In fact, I daresay this is a sequel that often surpasses its predecessor, as our pair of protagonists travel from the Old West to the Old World – London, to be exact – on a quest of honor and revenge. The anamorphic DVD contains an audio commentary with director David Dobkin, an audio commentary with writers Alfred Gough & Miles Millar, deleted scenes, and featurettes ("Fight Manual" & "Action Overload").

Picture
Picture

(Miramax, Rated R, DVD-$29.99 SRP)

Ararat is a film-within-a-film, documenting the life changing power the making of a movie about the brutal Turkish genocide of the Armenians between 1915-1918 has on a young  man hired as a driver for the production. Director Atom Egoyan ( The Sweet Hereafter) fills the screen with horrific images that drive home the brutality of man against man, illuminating the reasons why the memories of atrocities – and desire for closure - are passed down from generation to generation. The 2-disc anamorphic DVD contains an audio commentary with Egoyan, deleted scenes with optional commentary, a making-of featurette, "Arsinee Khanjian on Ararat" featurette, "Portrait of Arshile" short with optional commentary, Raffi's video footage, historical information, and the theatrical trailer.

Picture
Picture

(HBO, Not Rated, DVD-$29.99 SRP)

HBO's The Corner won 3 Emmys – and it deserved the honors. This 6-hour miniseries chronicled a "year in the life" of an inner-city street corner, told through the lives of 15-year-old DeAndre McCullogh, his family, and their friends, and enemies. One of the major motivating forces in the story – affecting everyone's lives – is the drug trade. But the beauty of the mini-series is that's just one of the struggles taking place. Director Charles S. Dutton breathes life into all of the dramas – personal and societal – facing the characters.

Picture
Picture

(Buena Vista, Not Rated, DVD-$59.99 SRP)

It was before the beginning of the second season of Felicity that star Keri Russell cut her hair and – in the opinion of many a critic and irate fan – destroyed what had been a charming tale of a love sick college girl in the big city. Frankly, I never understood what the hell they were talking about. The show was never a "classic", but was consistently entertaining it its own inoffensive way. So what to make of Russell's somehow Samsonian shearing of the show's success? Complete nonsense. And to be honest, I liked her better with short hair. Either way, all 23 episodes of the Sophomore year are contained in this 6-disc set, as well as bonus features including audio commentaries, the original ½ hour pilot presentation, and cast auditions.

Picture
Picture

(New Line, Rated R, DVD-$27.98 SRP)

Yes, it's a sequel to a not especially great horror flick, but there's a certain joie de vivre (ironically enough) to Final Destination 2. Yes, Death is back on the warpath following the escape of a group of individuals from a catastrophic event (this go round, it's a nicely executed Rube Goldbergian highway pile-up). The anamorphic DVD contains three documentaries ("The Terror Gauge", "Cheating Death", and "Bits and Pieces"), deleted and alternate scenes, and audio commentary, screen tests, behind-the-scenes footage, and the theatrical trailer. There are worse ways to spend a weekend, so pop some popcorn, grab a drink, turn off the lights, kick back and enjoy.

Picture
Picture

(Criterion, Not Rated, DVD-$29.95 SRP)

Based on a true story and filmed in a documentary style, The Honeymoon Killers about a lonely woman's dangerous relationship with a smooth-talking con artist – a relationship that evolves into a murderous grifting duo. As shocking as it is compelling, it's a film that definitely leaves a mark. The anamorphic DVD contains a new interview with the director and an illustrated essay on the true story upon which it's based.

Picture
Picture

(Lion's Gate, Not Rated, DVD-$22.99 SRP)

Despite a noble attempt, Kingpin does not reach the storytelling heights that are evident in any given season of The Sopranos. Still, for network TV, it's a revelation. Focusing on a modern Mexican crime family steeped in the drug trade, it's almost like The Sopranos meets Traffic, with a healthy does of Shakespeare thrown in for good measure. This set contains all six episodes in anamorphic widescreen, as well as cast interviews and interview with the executive producer/creator.

Picture
Picture

(Universal, Rated R, DVD-$26.98 SRP)

As thrillers go, this film manages to maintain just enough energy to make it an enjoyable ride, but not nearly enough to make it memorable. Kevin Spacey plays a professor, and noted activist against capital punishment, who may – or may not – be responsible for killing a fellow activist. The mysteries and conspiracies begin to mount as he recounts his story to a reporter (Kate Winslet). The anamorphic DVD  contains an audio commentary with director Alan Parker, deleted scenes with optional commentary, featurettes ("The Making Of David Gale", "The Music Of David Gale" and "Death In Texas"), poster concepts, and the theatrical trailer.

Picture
Picture

(Fox, Rated PG-13, DVD-$29.98 SRP)

As a film, I hated Daredevil. I found it to be an insipid abomination that brought back unpleasant memories of the dark days of Marvel at the movies (the original Punisher, anyone?). I'm recommending the DVD, however, because of the wonderful 60-minute documentary about the comic book on Disc 2. Heck, any doc that would manage to include the great artist Gene Colan in its historical overview deserves to be viewed.

Picture
Picture

(Home Vision, Not Rated, DVD-$29.95 SRP)

Any film that has George C. Scott talking to dolphins should be placed on an altar and worshipped for all its camp glory. Scott stars as a scientist that teaches dolphins to speak – uncovering a government assassination plot in the process. I kid you not. Considering it was written by Buck Henry and directed by Mike Nichols, perhaps you can believe it. The anamorphic DVD contains an interview with Henry and co-stars Edward Hermann and Leslie Chaleson, trivia, dolphin bios, and an essay from The Onion.

Picture
Picture

(Columbia/Tristar, Rated R, DVD-$24.95 SRP)

Okay, so I Love You to Death is a black comedy. A really dark black comedy. Pitch black. Loosely based on a true story about a wife who put a contract out on her husband, which failed miserably despite numerous what-would-normally-be successful attempts on his life, the premise is kicked up to a ludicrous degree here. When her husband's cheating is uncovered, Rosalie Boca (Tracey Ullman) hires a pair of hitmen to off him. Kevin Kline turns in a performance second only to his turn in A Fish Called Wanda.

Picture
Picture

(A&E, Not Rated, DVD-$79.95 SRP)

Joe McClaine is the newest secret agent to join the World Intelligence Network. He's also only 9 years-old. However, by using the Brain Impulse Galvanoscope Record and Transfer (BIG RAT), any skill, experience, or knowledge can be transferred into our tiny hero. It's also one of Gerry Anderson's classic supermarionation series, containing all of the fun and adventure we've come to expect. This 4-disc set contains all 30 episodes, fully restored and remastered with bonus features including an audio commentary with designer Mike Trim on the pilot episode and a commentary with director Ken Turn.

Picture
Picture

(A&E, Not Rated, DVD-$79.95 SRP)

Although quite inferior to the original 60's run of The Avengers, the mid 70's attempt at a relaunch – The New Avengers – is notable for one thing… it starred Joanna Lumley. Long before Absolutely Fabulous made her an international star, Lumley was a model (the usual pedigree for any actress drafted into an Avengers series) who was tapped to sorta stand beside Patrick Macnee's John Steed. The "sorta" in question comes from the fact that Steed was relegated to more of an advisory role, with Lumley's Purdey sent out on missions with agent Mike Gambit. Kind of like the mediocre end of The X-Files. Still, it's good that A&E is allowing completionists to own this series, even if it is not entirely enjoyable. This 4 disc box-set contains all 13 episodes from the first season, as well as photo galleries.

Picture
Picture

(Walt Disney, Rated G, DVD-$29.99 SRP)

I'm really torn about these "Pooh Pix". As much as I loathe the corruption of the once great Disney Animation Ideal (which has crumbled under bargain budget production), I can't escape my love for all things Pooh. So sue me. The latest sucker-punch to my sensibilities is Piglet's Big Movie, a charming little piece with low self-esteem, as Piglet disappears into the woods after overhearing that he's "just too small" to help the gang gather hunny, leaving it up to his friends to try and find him. The anamorphic DVD contains "Piglet's Big Book Of Memories" game and "The World According To Piglet".

Picture
Picture

(A&E, Not Rated, DVD-$99.95 SRP)

Before CSI was a glimmer in the eye of giddy CBS execs, NBC had Profiler. The show's focus is forensic psychologist Dr. Samantha "Sam" Waters, who possesses the uncanny ability to interpret the often disparate clues left at a crime scene and "see" what happened. Her life is thrown into turmoil when a serial killer murders her family. Brought out of self-imposed exile by the Bureau, she attempts to pick up where she left off – solving crimes, with the help of a team of experts. More character driven than CSI, Profiler was a taut drama that I'm more than happy has finally made it to DVD. The 6-disc set features all 20 first season episodes (save, for some reason, Episode #4… rights issues, maybe?). Bonus features include an audio commentary with stars Ally Walker and Robert Davi on the pilot episode "Insight", "Profiles Of Evil: Inside The Criminal Mind" episode of A&E's American Justice, cast bios, and a photo gallery.

Picture
Picture

(Miramax, Rated R, DVD-$29.99 SRP)

You know, you can't help but get a kick out of Michael Caine in full-on Oscar mode. It always seems that, when he senses the potential of a little golden reward, he cranks his performance up to 11. One such outing is The Quiet American, in which Caine portrays British journalist Thomas Fowler (a thinly veiled Graham Greene), who is caught up in the rapidly deteriorating political situation in 1950's Vietnam. A love triangle develops between a young American (Brendan Fraser) and Greene's mistress, further complicating an already volatile situation. The anamorphic DVD contains an audio commentary with director Phillip Noyce, a behind-the-scenes featurette, anatomy of a scene feature, and the theatrical trailer.

Picture
Picture

(Paramount, Not Rated, DVD-$19.99 SRP)

It's taken awhile, but Spongebob Squarepants is finally getting the respect it deserves on DVD. With the newest compilation, Tide and Seek , the collection of 10 episodes also contains two audio commentaries (with Tom Kenny and Stephen Hillenburg), and a storyboard for one of the episodes. Perhaps it's an acknowledgement of the substantial adult audience the Sponge-one attracts. Regardless, it's a welcome addition, and one I hope continues.

Picture
Picture

(BBC, Not Rated, DVD-$29.98 SRP)

Hello, my name is Ken, and I'm a weather junkie. I watch all the documentaries on Discovery, I surf The Weather Channel, I pull up my blinds during a thunderstorm. I also got a kick out of The Weather, a 4-part documentary that combines special effects, archive footage, and globe-spanning adventures covering "Wind", "Wet", "Cold", and "Heat." The two-disc set also contains an interview, fact files, and selections from the score. Me, I'm hoping for a volume 2.

Picture

Tibby's Bowl Entertainment Magazine copyright 2003 by Kenneth Plume. All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in part or in whole without permission is prohibited. All articles, stories, and columns contained within are copyright their respective authors.